Sanhedrin – Good News for March 27

27 03 2010

John 11:45-56

Many of the Jews who had come to Mary and seen what Jesus had done began to believe in him. But some of them went to the Pharisees and told them what Jesus had done. So the chief priests and the Pharisees convened the Sanhedrin and said, “What are we going to do? This man is performing many signs. If we leave him alone, all will believe in him, and the Romans will come and take away both our land and our nation.”

But one of them, Caiaphas, who was high priest that year, said to them, “You know nothing, nor do you consider that it is better for you that one man should die instead of the people, so that the whole nation may not perish.” He did not say this on his own, but since he was high priest for that year, he prophesied that Jesus was going to die for the nation, and not only for the nation, but also to gather into one the dispersed children of God. So from that day on they planned to kill him. So Jesus no longer walked about in public among the Jews, but he left for the region near the desert, to a town called Ephraim, and there he remained with his disciples.

Now the Passover of the Jews was near, and many went up from the country to Jerusalem before Passover to purify themselves. They looked for Jesus and said to one another as they were in the temple area, “What do you think? That he will not come to the feast?”

The Daily Path: Today I have to consult my Scripture for Dummies Process – aka: Google. When reading the Gospel I often find terms that I know absolutely nothing about… yes, yes, I hear you… I should have paid closer attention during my twelve years of parochial school! Today’s Google quest: What was the Sanhedrin?

According to Shira Schoenberg of The Jewish Virtual Library, the Sanhedrin was the ancient Jewish court system. The Great Sanhedrin was the supreme religious body in the Land of Israel during the time of the Holy Temple. It dealt with religious and ritualistic Temple matters, criminal matters appertaining to the secular court, trials of adulterous wives, tithes, preparation of Torah Scrolls, drawing up the calendar and the solving of difficulties relating to ritual law. It was the final authority on Jewish law and any scholar who went against its decisions was put to death as a rebellious elder. The Sanhedrin judged accused lawbreakers, but could not initiate arrests. It required a minimum of two witnesses to convict a suspect. There were no attorneys. Instead, the accusing witness stated the offense in the presence of the accused and the accused could call witnesses on his own behalf. The court questioned the accused, the accusers and the defense witnesses.

I hope this helps as we move into Holy Week and read of what Jesus will have to endure.

Church by Jonathan Burstein

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