Advent Day 4 – Good News for December 1

1 12 2010

Matthew 15:39-37

At that time: Jesus walked by the Sea of Galilee, went up on the mountain, and sat down there. Great crowds came to him, having with them the lame, the blind, the deformed, the mute, and many others. They placed them at his feet, and he cured them. The crowds were amazed when they saw the mute speaking, the deformed made whole, the lame walking, and the blind able to see, and they glorified the God of Israel.

Jesus summoned his disciples and said, “My heart is moved with pity for the crowd, for they have been with me now for three days and have nothing to eat. I do not want to send them away hungry, for fear they may collapse on the way.” The disciples said to him, “Where could we ever get enough bread in this deserted place to satisfy such a crowd?”

Jesus said to them, “How many loaves do you have?” “Seven,” they replied, “and a few fish.” He ordered the crowd to sit down on the ground. Then he took the seven loaves and the fish, gave thanks, broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, who in turn gave them to the crowds. They all ate and were satisfied. They picked up the fragments left over–seven baskets full.

The Daily Path: I used to think of miracles as the rarest of big events – like feeding a multitude with just a few fish and loves. Now I have come to see that miracles are also small actions that render an equally big impact in someone’s life. Restoration of sight isn’t only related to vision through one’s eyes. Feeding the hungry isn’t just about filling the stomach. Money isn’t the only means to lift someone off the ground. Advent is the time to consider how we, too, can create miracles in the life of another. Far reaching miracles that will touch us as well. Let your heart be moved.





Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? – Good News for November 3

3 11 2008

Luke 14: 12-14

On a sabbath Jesus went to dine at the home of one of the leading Pharisees. He said to the host who invited him, “When you hold a lunch or a dinner, do not invite your friends or your brothers or sisters or your relatives or your wealthy neighbors, in case they may invite you back and you have repayment.

Rather, when you hold a banquet, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind; blessed indeed will you be because of their inability to repay you. For you will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous.” 

The Daily Path: “Hope is not a recipe for success.” – Sr. Vice President (major corporation based in California)

While I understand this exec’s point in delivering that pearl of corporate wisdom, I would offer “You can’t succeed without hope.”

And speaking of hope… Have you considered how fallout from the stock market crash is affecting the Catholic Church’s ability to offer a banquet to the needy as described by St. Luke? An article in the Pittsburgh Business Times focused on how the economic downturn has impacted local churches in PA. The article described mixed effects, including how some parishes have not seen a normal upward trend following the usual summer drop. But here’s the quote that struck me:

“Sometimes in hard times, people give more because they come back to what’s important in life. Materialism can really get in the way of our spiritual values.” – Fr. Joseph Kleppner of St. Frances Cabrini parish. 

Ain’t it the truth?